Take Take Take Tape Tame Take

Screening

Apr 21, 12:00 AM - 01:00 AM

Co-presented by

TAKE TAKE TAKE TAPE TAME TAKE is an option for considering illicit drug use, comparatively altered states, identity, and our necessarily polyphonic relationships to The Real.

This programme of experimental and non-narrative shorts - selected from the past decade of additions to the CFMDC Catalogue - will be shown separately to four members of Mikiki's community of people who use drugs (PWUD). As they watch, Mikiki records their real-time commentary and critique responding to their assigned viewing. These recordings will subsequently be anonymized using artist @ZeesyPowers' Anti-Selfie filter, an augmented reality overlay originally made for @CrisisVision, an Instagram project curated by Andrea Cooper.

This 'nude preview reel' - without the accompanying response recordings - will be screened on April 20 at 8pm. The next screening on April 27 at 9pm will include the simultaneous orations of the critical, curious, and boisterous feedback by PWUD.

Works Featured:

Pariah, my brother, I follow you show me the route to the springs by Esery Mondesir (Canada / 19:45 / 2019)

The holiday season is fast approaching in Tijuana, Mexico where Saül and his father-in-law, Mathieu are getting ready for a busy day at the street market selling recycled tennis shoes. In the darkness of Dawn, the deserted road to the Market swells up with memories of their migration journey. After a long trek from Haiti, Brazil and nine other South and Central-American countries, they have been here two years, waiting for a chance to claim asylum in the US. We too shall wait for the sunrise, haunted by the words of Davertige, he too, a passer-by on The Route to the springs hoping to quench the thirst for freedom, liberty and the pursuit of happiness, a simple human dream the Americans call theirs. Saul and Mathieu are not waiting; they build, they love, they live.

Home of the Buffalo/Au Pays des Esprits by Rémy Huberdeau (Canada / 4:26 / 2009)

Constructed from Canadian prairie archival images taken between 1920 and 1940, this film lyrically explores a son/daughter's relationship with his/her father and the family's relationship to their land.

The Bed & The Street by Mike Hoolboom & Heather Frise (Canada / 4:30 / 2018)

A love story set in the global anti-austerity demonstrations. As citizens take back their streets, two women meet and fall in love. What geometry of desire will help overthrow the state? What micro-politics of sharing and communality will provide fuel for demonstrations that will remove and replace the neo-liberal consensus? Cast in a palimpsest of images and sounds, as if there were no way to separate inside and out, the street and the bedroom.

Human Walkers in Motion by Ethann Néon (Belgium / 10:53 / 2020)

The walk inhabits our being and governs our social space. Side by side or face to face, it implies an exchange. When combining everyone's specific pace, a hidden harmony arises. Reconnecting with Eadweard Muybridge's work, this film projects us into the frenetic rhythm of the steps of fifty walkers.

Emergence by Nadine Valcin (Canada / 6:35 / 2017 )

"Emergence" is a video installation created to counter the violence of blackface in its representation of Blackness. This piece re-asserts the beauty of Blackness and challenges the reductive nature of contemporary Canadian blackface through extreme close-ups of black faces in all their diversity.

Shot in extreme slow motion and projected by two projectors at a large scale on two screens, the images appear to be stills at first, but reveal themselves over time to be moving. These parts of lips, noses, eyes, posit the face as a signifying landscape. Serene images contrast with others that depict faces and arms pressed against glass, at once distorting them and alluding to the constraining conditions that trap black bodies in stereotypes as well as their struggle to break free.

6500 by Lisa Truttman (U.S.A. & Austria / 08:43 / 2015)

The color temperature of different light sources is measured in Kelvin. 6500 Kelvin corresponds to the value of overcast daylight and is used as a standard for the neutral registration of white surfaces. Unconsciously the human eye adapts to different light conditions, while cameras need adjustment through white balance.
6500 is a short video essay on the relativity of words, questioning the application of absolute values in an argument, visualized through a play on colors, their spaces, and their highly subjective perception. Quotes from Ludwig Wittgenstein's "Remarks on Colour" emphasize this rhythmic flickering and slightly absurd conversation between colour and language.

Confidente by Karen Ackerman & Miguel Seabra Lopes (Brazil / 12:27 / 2016)

This is me.

Blue Cigarette by Ricardo Vieira Lisboa (Portugal / 2:15 / 2017)

When filming smoke, in color, cinematographers must avoid the "blue smoke" phenomenon. "Blue Cigarette" is a direct cinema experience on 16mm film, it takes the same time of a cigarette burning and is filled with cigarette burns. The strip was tortured, scratched, punctured, erased, colored, and animated: an exploration on the volatility of the film medium, as if it was itself a cigarette and one could smoke it all the way.

Abandoned by soJin Chun (Taiwan / 5:31 / 2018)

An unfinished housing complex has been abandoned. The imagined future from the past is taken over by foliage and wildlife.

Program Still: by Esery Mondesir

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